Subject: What’s That Bug?
Location: Turkey, Near Dalaman
November 27, 2014 3:23 am
Hi there. I would be so grateful if you could help me identify this beautiful creature. I found him in Turkey over the summer and need an accurate ID so that I can submit the picture to stock libraries. Many thanks indeed, lovely to know about your website as I often have critters to identify!
Signature: Yours bugfully,

Longhorned Borer Beetle

Longhorned Borer Beetle

This is a Longhorned Borer Beetle in the family Cerambycidae, most likely in the subfamily Lepturinae, the Flower Longhorns.  We have not had any luck with any matching images regarding the species classification.

Update:  We agree with Cesar Crash’s comment that this looks like Chlorophorus varius.

 

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Glowworm or Firefly Larva
Location: NE New Jersey, zip 07838
November 26, 2014 11:32 am
As I read that these can be tricky to ID, I’d appreciate your input.
I found it because it had it’s little light stuck in the air out of a grass covered bank along the side of the old Free Union United Methodist church. It was just a pin-prick of light, but bright enough to catch my eye.
Geographic location: NE New Jersey, zip 07838
Date: October 14, 2014
Temperature – 68F (using the Jenny Jump weather station historical data.)
Signature: Phil Wooldridge

Firefly Larva

Firefly Larva

Dear Phil,
This is a Firefly Larva, and we are basing that identification on the information that you provided about seeing a light.  Firefly Larvae are not easily confused with Glowworms which also bioluminescnce.  Firefly Larvae most closely resemble, hence are confused with Netwing Beetle Larvae that are not capable of emitting light. 

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Subject: beautiful moth
Location: Lanzarote
November 26, 2014 6:00 am
Hi found this on the bed and wondered what tyep of moth it was
Signature: miss

Hawkmoth

Barbury Spurge Hawkmoth

Dear miss,
Before we could even begin to attempt to identify your Hawkmoth in the family Sphingidae, we needed to first research the location of Lanzarote, which we have learned is in the Canary Islands.
  Once that was established, we quickly identified your Hawkmoth as Hyles tithymali on EnAcademic and then we verified the identification on Sphingidae of the Western Palaearctic where we learned it has a common name: Barbary Spurge Hawkmoth.  The Sphingidae of the Western Palaearctic site states:  “Restricted to the Canary and ?Cape Verde Islands, where it is widespread, occurring from sea-level to 1000m in short-lived but well-defined colonies (Schurian & Grandisch, 1991). Commonest in the drier and warmer parts, such as dry sand dunes, steep-sided valleys (van der Heyden, 1988), and cultivated areas where its main hostplant is most abundant.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: what bug is this
Location: Malaysia
November 25, 2014 8:25 am
Hi bugman, it was raining out there and a bug flew in my house. It looks like a cockroach but it is not. It is very rare to see it. I took a picture of it and hope that you can help me to identify this wonderful creature. Thank you.
Signature: Kah Wei

Longicorn

Longicorn

Dear Kah Wei,
This is a Longhorned Borer Beetle or Longicorn in the family Cerambycidae, but we are uncertain of the species.

Subject: Marmorated Stink Bug but much prettier
Location: Somerville, Massachusetts
November 25, 2014 11:58 am
Hi, Can you help me ID this beautiful bug that’s been sitting on my garage door opener in Massachusetts. It is most similar in appearance to the
Marmorated Stink Bug, Halyomorpha halys Stål. However, the triangle
markings on its wings are very exotic and remind me of the Giant
Mesquite bug.
The underwings have 4 white bands
The back legs have 3 white bands
the antenna have 3 sections of increasingly lighter browns
The brown eyes extend outward from the head and are set on either side
of an elongated head
It has a white leaf/spade pattern painted on the the second section of
its body attached to the head.
The second part of triangle on its wings/back have outlined white
rectangles set at a 45-degree angle from the center line of the wing.
Signature: Miriam

Western Conifer Seed Bug

Western Conifer Seed Bug

Dear Miriam,
The Western Conifer Seed Bug,
Leptoglossus occidentalis, is native to the Pacific Northwest, but sometime in the 1960s, it began to expand its range.  We suspect the range expansion is connected to the increased frequency of human travel patterns.  Western Conifer Seed Bugs often attract attention when they enter homes to hibernate as the weather begins to cool.

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Subject: Any idea what this is?

Location: Concord, CA.
November 25, 2014 4:49 pm
Dear Bugman,
I have only seen this bug a few times on Contra Costa County of California.
Any idea what it is?
Signature: Don

Snakefly

Snakefly

Dear Don,
This is one of the best images we have seen of a Snakefly in the order Raphidioptera.  Snakeflies are harmless predators.

Thanks Daniel
It was a bug I had never seen before and the first time I saw it was on a hospital floor.
I wondered if it was some kind of rare exotic poisonous bug that had landed somebody in that hospital.
Its good to know its a fairly normal bug. :)
Thanks very much for the identification!
Kind Regards,
Don

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