Subject: larva of what?
Location: Meadow in Southern MN USA
August 24, 2014 7:56 pm
Hello there Bugman & Staff,
We work at the local Nature center here & ran across this unusual bug. We have these two shots of it. We have searched, but to no avail… now I am searching sites online. This was found friday aug. 22nd, in a meadow on a grass. It did not seem to be feeding on the plant. We found it during our search for monarch caterpillars. ( We tag the adults & use some of them in a display for the public). We would appreciate any help or guidance identifying this small creature. We are located in Southern Minnesota.
Thank you kindly,
Jillian
Signature: Nature Center Staff

Sunflower Tortoise Beetle Larva

Sunflower Tortoise Beetle Larva

Dear Jillian,
We knew immediately that this creature is a Tortoise Beetle Larva, and that thing on the end of its tail is excrement.
  We felt it could not be an Arizona Tortoise Beetle, Physonota arizonae, but we also believed it was closely related.  We believe it is the Sunflower Tortoise Beetle Larva, Physonota helianthi, which we identified on BugGuide and that belongs in the same genus.  According to BugGuide:  “Food: hosts on members of the aster family, Asteraceae.”

Sunflower Tortoise Beetle Larva

Sunflower Tortoise Beetle Larva

 

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Hummingbird Clearwing Moth
Location: Evanston, IL
August 25, 2014 10:47 am
Here is a photo I captured in our school garden one summer about five years ago. Just a few weeks ago I saw two more of these moths in our garden but did not have my camera on me. Don’t think, however, I could get better than this.
Signature: Lynn Hyndman

Snowberry Clearwing

Snowberry Clearwing

Hi Lynn,
We believe you have misidentified this diurnal sphinx moth, and that it is
Hemaris diffinis, the Snowberry Clearwing or Bumblebee Moth, not a Hummingbird Clearwing.  The two species look quite similar as they are in the same genus, but the Snowberry Clearwing is slightly smaller and has black legs, not light legs like the Hummingbird Clearwing.  The Sphingidae of the Americas site has an excellent image with both species for comparison.  Your image is quite nice.

Subject: Soapberry bugs
Location: Pretoria, South Africa
August 25, 2014 10:06 am
here’s the pictures of the bugs I found on the trunks of these trees. Some people have them in their gardens too, but I’ve never seen them anywhere else. This picture was taken at the start of the winter.
Signature: Cindy

Cotton Stainer Aggregation

Cotton Stainer Aggregation

Dear Cindy,
We disagree with your identification.  We do not believe these are Soapberry Bugs in the subfamily Serinethinae, but rather Cotton Stainers  or Red Bugs in the family Pyrrhocoridae.  There are some similar looking images of Cotton Stainers in the genus
Dysdercus on ISpot and there is an image on FlickR identified as Dysdercus nigrofasciatus.  This note is also posted on ISpot:  “D. nigrofasciatus and D. fasciatus are not synonyms. There are four species of Dysdercus occurring in South Africa: fasciatus, nigrofasciatus, intermedius and superstitiosus. the first three looks superficially similar, but there are clear differences, for example: the head of fasciatus is significantly longer than the head of nigrofasciatus, etc.”  We are confident that the genus Dysdercus is correct, but we are uncertain of the species.

Cotton Stainer Aggregation

Cotton Stainer Aggregation

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Indian or Hobomok skipper?
Location: Great Falls Park, Virginia
August 24, 2014 4:27 pm
Looking at various sources, I am not sure one can tell the difference, but do you have an opinion as to whether this is an Indian or Hobomok Skipper? Both look just like what I photographed as far as I can see. No other angles, unfortunately, as didn’t move until it flew off. …
Signature: Seth

Skipper

Skipper

Hi Seth,
We are posting your excellent image of a Skipper in the hope that one of our readers can provide you with an identification.

Subject: Indian or Hobomok skipper?
Location: Great Falls Park, Virginia
August 24, 2014 4:27 pm
Looking at various sources, I am not sure one can tell the difference, but do you have an opinion as to whether this is an Indian or Hobomok Skipper? Both look just like what I photographed as far as I can see. No other angles, unfortunately, as didn’t move until it flew off. I am also attaching a photo of what presumably is a Cicada Killer Wasp (it was after all, killing an Annual Cicada!), mainly because it has a great deal more yellow than any photo I can find – is this just natural variation? A difference between the sexes? Or is there a sub-species I haven’t seen mentioned?
Signature: Seth

European Hornet kills Cicada

European Hornet kills Cicada

Hi Seth,
We will address the Skipper question later, but most Skippers look alike to our untrained eye.  What you have mistaken for a Cicada Killer with prey is actually an invasive, exotic European Hornet, a formidable predator that can take down very large prey.
  According to BugGuide:  “Predatory on other insects, used to feed young.”  There is also this elaboration:  “The workers capture insects, bringing them back to the nest to feed the brood. Workers need more high-energy sugary foods such as sap and nectar, and hornet larvae are able to exude a sugary liquid which the workers can feed on.”

Subject: strange caterpillar
Location: Baddeck,N.S, Canada
August 25, 2014 8:12 am
We found this caterpillar in our yard. We didn’t touch but we moved it to a wooded area. What is it?
Signature: Tera C

Luna Moth Caterpillar

Luna Moth Caterpillar

Hi Tera,
This sure looks like a Luna Moth Caterpillar getting ready to pupate.  When pupation time nears, the typically green caterpillar turns pink.  See this BugGuide image for comparison.

Luna Moth Caterpillar

Luna Moth Caterpillar

Great that is exactly what we saw today. Thanks